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Old Jun 30, 2007, 07:55 AM   #1
Wisecentaur
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Minting Technique

Hello,

While looking through coins on http://www.coinarchives.com/a/ , I came across these interesting coins. It appears to me that this proves that the coin blanks were made in a continuous strip, then struck, and then broken apart. I had known that flans were made in this method but had not thought that keeping them in a single piece would facilitate the striking of the coins. Is this documented somewhere else?

I am currently experimenting with my own set of dies and found it quite difficult to place a flan on the lower die then strike it in the manner that is usually described as the ancient method. First keeping the dies steady is not as easy as it would seem, secondly, it is difficult to hit the top die hard enough while holding the die and the die and flan slips when it is struck. Also understand that I am using soft pewter not bronze. It seems to me the minting was at least a two man operation for any volume.

Certainly we can assume that this technique would have only been used on the coins that exhibit residuals of the linking metal.

Thank you for comments,

Dave
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Old Jun 30, 2007, 12:08 PM   #2
vozmozhno
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If coins were struck in a strip then how would you account for brockages? My initial reaction to that photo is that it looks like two coins from a hoard which have become fused together rather than an indication of how the coins were originally manufactured.

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Old Jun 30, 2007, 01:05 PM   #3
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The exact same orientation of the devices cannot be the result of the haphazard fusing of coins in a hoard (well, it could, but is so unlikely as to strain belief). Obviously, brockages are the result of coins not struck in this fashion. I wonder if many ever were, even with trees of cast blanks. George S
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Old Jun 30, 2007, 02:28 PM   #4
GMoneti
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I think it's possible that they were struck in a strip. Apart from the uniform alignment, the upper coin also shows that there was another one attached to it. The bottom coin was most likely the one end of the strip.
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Old Jun 30, 2007, 02:44 PM   #5
vic9128
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"Coins were often struck by moving strips of cast flans through the dies and later cutting them apart."

from

http://www.classicalcoins.com/page103.html
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Old Jun 30, 2007, 08:36 PM   #6
Wisecentaur
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Vic,

Thank you for pointing me to the Classical Coins Website. I have been there before and have read all the information on that page but don't remember that this method was addressed.

The particular Himera coin(s) that were shown in the photos I posted sold for $1965.00. It must be quite rare to find coins that were not broken apart after striking. The actual coin type is common and not very expensive.

Thanks again,

Dave
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Old Jul 10, 2007, 02:22 PM   #7
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My mind continues to wonder about this minting technique. It would be very interesting to survey many of these Himera coins of the same die, and then calculate and tabulate their die rotation.

If there is a consistent die rotation then one might logically assume that there was a mechanical fixture that held the upper die over the lower. This eliminates the need for a person to hold the die and allows for a more consistent blow from the hammer as the upper die is always in the same place. This would also result in faster production times when coupled with the continuous flan strip.

Maybe the ancients celators were smarter than we give them credit. It seems we have lost so much of their art.

David
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