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Interactive Map Project A project to define and assemble a set of educational maps with ancient themes.

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Old Jan 8, 2004, 11:20 PM   #1
wgsant
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Ideas for Flash movie animations

This is a nice graphic tool for learning that lends itself well to a great variety of topics. Two that come to mind immediately are the stages of Roman Expansion and the Conquests of Alexander. On the fringe of antiquity, but still of great interest to many coin collectors is the growth of Islam. I look forward to watching your progress with this project.

Wayne

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Old Jan 10, 2004, 02:42 AM   #2
tjbuggey
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Ideas for Flash movie animations

So, what do you think would make the best topics for an interactive animation??????

Tom
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Old Jan 10, 2004, 10:04 AM   #3
wgsant
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Ideas for Flash movie animations

Tom;

I am an art historian, so images have a primacy of interest to me. I think that the topic of cultural diffusion has a lot of very interesting possibilities for an interactive map. Perhaps the most obvious is the diffusion of Egyptian religious beliefs to other parts of the ancient world. The cults of Isis and Sarapis, for example, became very widespread. Another widespread migration, especially during the Roman era, was the cult of Mithras. Later, Zoroastrianism and Buddhism had periods of great expansion. And of course the rise of Christianity is a very popular topic among collectors of ancient coins. All of these religions were manifested in coinage of the lands where they found acceptance. It would be interesting to see an animation that revealed the source of each religion and the speed and extent to which it spread, along with perhaps some visual representations of coins that reflect elements of that particular religion.

Wayne

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Old Jan 11, 2004, 12:19 AM   #4
tjbuggey
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Flash capabilities

We may need some clarification from Bill regarding the range of features that Flash can offer. The image of the spread of a religion or an empire would be very powerful if the transitions could be made so short that it looks like it is flowing out from a central point. I think the Byzantine Empire would be perfect for this considering the ebbs and flows associated with its history.

Bill, would it be possible to get a list of features for flash posted?

I would give my eye teeth (I may already have) to see a 500 year span depicted the origination and spread of major religions. I am sure that has never been done. That would be quite the research project.

Tom
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Old Jan 12, 2004, 07:34 PM   #5
tjbuggey
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Required Reading

Please read the post by Bill in the TimeMap thread of the Map project and follow the links provided to the TimeMap site. You will be impressed. You will also get a feel for the range of options this technology presents.

Thanks and ain't this exciting!

Tom
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Old Jan 12, 2004, 08:29 PM   #6
bpuetz
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Tom,

If we can pull together the data, we can certainly do a map depicting the spread of religions. It would certainly be interesting to watch the presentation, and even better if we could interact with it, like looking at the numbers of adherents over time, etc.

One point regarding this sort of depiction came up when I was discussing our project with Ian Johnson, the TimeMap Director. It was his opinion that the way we handled transition in our initial Flash map was probably more historically accurate than the way it was handled in the Korean map. That is, we faded in the various countries, rather than morphed them (the advancing lines you see in the Korean example). The morphing implies more precision than is actually possible given the historical data.

Bill
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Old Jan 12, 2004, 09:41 PM   #7
tjbuggey
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I imagine each format would suit different topics. We talk about the "spread of religions" and that is probably pretty much how it worked. Missionaries, word of mouth, etc. probably results in a "creep" similar to that on the Korean map. While we may not have much of the story of the exact progression of a religion, we can make a lot of suppositions. For example, we know when Christianity is first mentioned in relation to Antioch, Ephesos, and Corinth. We might also make some suppositions about how fast it spread inland to Sardis and other hinterland areas by tracing trade routes and roads. When you add the creep, you are almost simulating a computer model of the spread of the religion.
On the other hand, the spread of an empire that conquers and annexes is probably best represented by the morph. Lots of possibilities.
Visually, I do like the creep better than the morph - but hey, both are marvelous.

Tom
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Old Jan 13, 2004, 09:22 AM   #8
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Correction

Whoops, got morph and fade reversed in the above post. Meant to say - I like the morph better than the fade. and empires growing might be best depicted with the fade.

TB
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Old Jan 16, 2004, 06:58 PM   #9
Witikind
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I have a couple of ideas for this map project:

1. One that would show over time the expansion and contraction of the Persian, Parthian and Sassanian empire(s).

2. One that would show over time the Macedonian conquest by Alexander III (which someone already suggested I think), and then the breakup after his death, and then the expansion and contractions (mostly the latter) of the various parts until absorbed by Rome.

Mike Wentink
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Old Jan 16, 2004, 07:52 PM   #10
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I would be interested in a map that shows the evolution of Greek weight standards, and their evolution over time.

I purchased an unidentified Greek fraction today at the NYINC show. I showed it to Brian Kritt, thinking perhaps he might recognize it. He immediately weighed it, then started naming cities on that weight standard.

I once tried to make a spreadsheet of weight standards but I quickly got confused. Replacing the spreadsheet with a map would be very interesting, and possibly would help to attribute early Greek coins.
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Old Jan 17, 2004, 02:00 AM   #11
tjbuggey
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If I might add a bit to Ed's idea, or maybe this is a divergence: And tell me if I'm off-base here -
The distribution of weight standards stayed relatively stable over time when compared to the rise and fall of the influence of city states. Occasionally weights were adopted by other cities/regions and others were rejected - some even passed from history (I am trying to think in Flash terms here = "layers"). An overlay of city- state influence, say their colonies and their trade sphere, combined with movement of weight standards over time might provide information that would appeal to a broader audience than just collectors.
I am also trying to think in terms of research. one team could research weight standards, one colonies, and yet another the economic sphere of influence. Layer these into a flash movie and voila.
These were the 3 factors I could visualize here. I am sure there are better ones.

Very good ideas.

Tom
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Old Jan 18, 2004, 10:22 AM   #12
Charax
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Parthia timeline map

Please visit my test web page at http://avrl.com/map_mea.htm for an example of a timeline map of the Parthian empire. Patiently wait for the entire page to load before operating the controls; it is full of redundant code and images, and so is very weighty, about 120K.

The 1-2-3 animation represents overlays which will show changes in the Parthian empire's territory over time; currently, only the 250 B.C., 1 AD and 250 A.D. points are selectable on the timeline. It is only a test and I suspended further Flash development in 2001. I still collect supporting maps and material to complete the project.

I needed topographical features underlying the map, so I purchased the Asia/Australia set of Mountain High relief maps from Digital Wisdom at http://www.mountainhighmap.com. The Adobe Illustrator versions of these maps imported perfectly into Flash with all their layers (although there are some AI version issues), so it was very easy to start manipulating the layers and creating new ones in Flash to fit my purpose. The Mountain High map set also includes large TIFF images and a 72-dpi relief map that exactly fits on a layer with perfect registration to the masks and features in the AI version of that region. The time and effort saved made it a good value, and I got a redistribution license.

Any comments will be much appreciated.

Cheers,

Chris Hopkins
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Old Jan 25, 2004, 12:16 AM   #13
fishhead
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An interactive map that would be really nice to see would be one that showed the movement/growth of the various Hellenistic kingdoms after Alexander, which also labelled the names of the kings of each kingdom through time (so far as we have this documented). It can be tough to get one's head around the movements in this period of history, and it would make it easier for understanding the historical context of those various Hellenistic coins of all those guys named 'Philip', 'Demetrius', 'Antiochus', or 'Seleucus' the somethingth. I think students of Judean coins would like to see this too, as it would put the interaction of these kingdoms with Judea in a useful context.
[edit - corrected typos]
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