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Old Feb 6, 2009, 03:23 PM   #1
paul1888
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porous obverse what is it caused by???



Hello, attached is a picture of a coin that I recently purchased (not from a VCoins Dealer). I got it from a German dealer and in the english version of the descriptiuon of the coin it did not indicated that the coin had a porous obverse. When I received the coin in the mail I was a little surprised when I took the coin out of the package and noticed that the obverse was porous.

Could anyone help me with some questions that I have?

1.) What causes porpous surfaces?
2.) Should I worry if the coin is authentic?

Thank,

Paul
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Old Feb 6, 2009, 03:55 PM   #2
tokenmaven
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paul1888 View Post


Hello, attached is a picture of a coin that I recently purchased (not from a VCoins Dealer). I got it from a German dealer and in the english version of the descriptiuon of the coin it did not indicated that the coin had a porous obverse. When I received the coin in the mail I was a little surprised when I took the coin out of the package and noticed that the obverse was porous.

Could anyone help me with some questions that I have?

1.) What causes porpous surfaces?
2.) Should I worry if the coin is authentic?

Thank,

Paul
Looks like a nice coin to me. I wouldn't worry about a little porosity.

Jeff
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Old Feb 6, 2009, 04:04 PM   #3
cogito
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Surface porosity can sometimes be a reassuring sign of authenticity, but its presence should not be used as a rule.

Jeff (other one)

Last edited by cogito : Feb 6, 2009 at 04:13 PM.
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Old Feb 6, 2009, 04:17 PM   #4
Roma_Orbis
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This porosity is due to the fact that the thin upper layer of full silver has quite disappeared, revealing a lesser silver content below, more subject to oxidation.

Jérôme
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Old Feb 8, 2009, 05:19 AM   #5
Roma_Numismatics
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It looks like a very nice coin all the same. The porosity looks to be only light, and it is still a very nice example of this type.
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Old Feb 9, 2009, 07:12 PM   #6
paul1888
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Thanks

Thanks. I appreciate the feedback. I was a little worried about the coin, but feel much better after the feedback. I am going to do some research on the causes of porosity in coins, since it seems to be an area I know little about and will post, for those that are interested, some of what I find.

Thanks again

Paul
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Old Mar 7, 2009, 08:52 AM   #7
reidgold
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How a coin changes over the centuries can be fascinating. With a coin more porous on one side than the other -- I have a Greek tet just like yours but with the porosity on the reverse -- what likely happened is that when it was in the ground for all those centuries the porous side was exposed to more water than the other side, which accelerated the corrosive reaction caused by the chemicals in the soil, sulfides, chlorides, and so on. One possible scenario is that the porous side for a long time was directly under a rain channel in the soil through which water from the surface made its way underground.
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