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Old Mar 3, 2007, 01:07 PM   #46
cogito
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That last vase, apart from drool-inducing, is fascinating in its use of the pegasus protome on the shield of Athena(?). This motif is very common to the coinage of Lampsakos and a few other issues, but I had always assumed that the protome was selected because the flan real estate was sparse on coins. The shield has plenty of empty space to fill out the remaining hind-quarter of the pegasus, which begs the question is this a repair sign or is the protome signaling origin from NW Coastal Asia Minor?

BTW - I, for one, would love to be plasticized and buried. This way when I'm dug up in the future, I can either be a fabulous museum piece or a banister figure for the filthy rich. Seriously. Once I'm dead. I don't care. My real wish is to have a tree planted over my body, so that my unused nutrients might be returned to the cycle of life. A live oak or sturdy fruit bearing tree would be nice. Sadly, I don't think that many funeral homes would accommodate the request.

Jeff
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Old Mar 3, 2007, 01:17 PM   #47
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Originally Posted by cogito View Post
That last vase, apart from drool-inducing, is fascinating in its use of the pegasus protome on the shield of Athena(?). This motif is very common to the coinage of Lampsakos and a few other issues, but I had always assumed that the protome was selected because the flan real estate was sparse on coins. The shield has plenty of empty space to fill out the remaining hind-quarter of the pegasus, which begs the question is this a repair sign or is the protome signaling origin from NW Coastal Asia Minor?

BTW - I, for one, would love to be plasticized and buried. This way when I'm dug up in the future, I can either be a fabulous museum piece or a banister figure for the filthy rich. Seriously. Once I'm dead. I don't care. My real wish is to have a tree planted over my body, so that my unused nutrients might be returned to the cycle of life. A live oak or sturdy fruit bearing tree would be nice. Sadly, I don't think that many funeral homes would accommodate the request.

Jeff
Jeff

Actually, there are a growing number of cemeteries dedicated to green burials. I think you could get your wish.

Unfortunately I am not a candidate. Years of "carpe diem" have disqualified me as a chemical free corpse. I guess you could say I have pro-actively embalmed myself.

Mark
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Old Mar 6, 2007, 03:30 PM   #48
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Mark,

I found some references in my catalogs, that could help to assess the prices of your dealer:

About Greek vases:
These Christies and Sothebys sales are full of Greek vases!
- Christies 8 June 2005, lot 83, wonderful attick balck-figured column krater, H36.5 cm, $18,000 (+fees)
- lot 105, Apulian red-figured hydria 32 cm, $10,200 (+fees)
- lot 106, Apulian red-figured hydria 32 cm, $7,800 (+fees)

About Roman cavalry helmets:
- Christies 11 Dec. 2003, lot 199, half Parade helmet representing a human face, fetched $30,000 (+fees)
- Christies 8 June 2005, lot 177, full Parade helmet (with backside) representing an Amazon head, fetched $100,000 (+fees)

A Greek bronze Corinthian helmet: same sale, lot 138, $28,680 (+fees)

If you want to purchase such items, you should consider buying Christies & Sothebies catalogs for references, this is a must. Furthermore, they are to archeology what NAC, Tkalec, .. are to ancient coins: they show the best.

Jérôme
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Old Mar 6, 2007, 07:28 PM   #49
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I just found the site for the dealer in question. They have some very impressive stuff.
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Old Mar 6, 2007, 07:42 PM   #50
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I just found the site for the dealer in question. They have some very impressive stuff.
Makes you want to go out and earn alot of money, doesn't it?

Shhhhhh for now if you will on the site. I'm sure the big money knows about it, but I would really be bummed if I get poached with two days to go.

I visit Friday morning. My wife hopes I am seriously disappointed. Especially since my pricey map arrives tomorrow.

As Zach says, I am diversifying my portfolio...........yeah right.

M
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Old Mar 6, 2007, 08:09 PM   #51
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One or the other

I guess I am the only one who likes the first piece better. The Attic piece is an example of very late balck figure, rather crudely done--the incised lines are typically sloppy on these late pieces and this is no exception. The other piece is a very well executed Apulian. I would compare the difference between the two to a late fifth century owl, poorly centered and only fine, to a New Style owl in EF. Which would you rather have, a mediocre specimen of a more desirable issue or an excellent example of a lesser issue? Of course, it all gets down to personal preference, so there is no "right" answer. As the Romans would have it, there is no sense disputing about matters of taste.
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Old Mar 7, 2007, 07:20 AM   #52
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Originally Posted by 4to2centophilia View Post
Makes you want to go out and earn alot of money, doesn't it?
Yeah, I'd love some of that stuff.


Quote:
Shhhhhh for now if you will on the site. I'm sure the big money knows about it, but I would really be bummed if I get poached with two days to go.
No worries here, my lips are sealed.


Let us know how your trip goes.
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Old Mar 7, 2007, 05:38 PM   #53
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No worries here, my lips are sealed.

Let us know how your trip goes.

I am going to be completely irresponsible and first spend the afternoon tomorrow at the Met since I haven't walked its halls in a few years, then hit a few other galleries. I will hit this one Friday.

I noticed a few more photos that just went up. Sort of like a museum where you can touch the history.
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Old Mar 8, 2007, 08:38 PM   #54
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Well, I could not wait and went to the gallery today instead.

First observation, lots of very nice things. They had a still semi crated marble statue for a tidy sum of $675k. Ouch.

Second observation. I noticed someone Photoshopping out blemishes from photos before listing them. Right there on the computer in front of me. Sobering.

Third observation. They shipped my pyxis to Europe for a show without telling me. I have to come back in 3 weeks to see it and the full inventory.

Fourth observation. I need to marry into money to get what I really want.

Short post since I am on blackberry.

Zach. I am drinking a saki and eating sushi in your honor.

Ttyl

Mark
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Old Mar 12, 2007, 06:00 PM   #55
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Mark,

You are my hero Hope the sushi and saki were as good as visiting the gallery!

I had a LOT of inventory catch up to do, so I will be catching up on forum stuff tomorrow as the new coins are all attributed now and ready to ship to John to be photographed when the last of them arrives.

--Beast
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Old Mar 20, 2007, 10:22 AM   #56
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For those who dabble in antiquities (or dream of doing so), this article came out on NY Times.

Do You Know Where That Art Has Been?

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/18/bu...tner=TOPIXNEWS

Giving credit where credit is due, I found the link at Meneer Michels site.

MVR's "unbiased " view of the article is that the writer has been duped into helping portray the Aboutaams far too well. Well, there may be an arguement there. They do get to spin a troubled market into a pitch for skyrocketing returns for well provenanced items.

In any case, it is IMO an interesting 4 page read.

Tot ziens

Mark
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Old Mar 20, 2007, 11:32 AM   #57
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"...lived by the philosophy that whoever loved an antiquity the most should own it."

Still struggling a bit with this philosophical position, but assuming that 1.) those who love it the most would take care of it the most and 2.) we all die and nothing is permanent. Then, the philosophy would yield a succession of wealthy caretakers of history...hmmm. Sort of like museums!

Jeff
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Old Mar 20, 2007, 11:48 AM   #58
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"...lived by the philosophy that whoever loved an antiquity the most should own it."

Jeff

I picked up on that also. I wonder if I should drop by their shop on Thursday and express my unrequited love for one of there $250k Attic Black vases, then show them my three rumpled hundreds and ask if I love it enough to own it.



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