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Old Mar 15, 2011, 10:52 AM   #1
djmacdo
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Leu 79, 31 Oct. 2000, lot 105

I need to find the following: Leu 79, 31 Oct. 2000, lot 105. Does anyone have access to this catalogue?
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Old Mar 15, 2011, 04:27 PM   #2
bpmurphy
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What do you need?

Imitative Thasos tetradrachm. 16.60 g. ATP monogram in left field. Yourokova 146; Gobl Class I var. No pedigree listed.

Barry Murphy
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Old Mar 22, 2011, 03:50 AM   #3
planet
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here is the coin and its descriptive notice
François
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Old Mar 22, 2011, 01:40 PM   #4
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Thank you!

Thank you to the several people who replied. I had, in fact, all the information, but a sudden mental lapse made me completely misplace it! I can, in fact, trace this very coin back to 1938!
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Old Mar 23, 2011, 10:47 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djmacdo View Post
Thank you to the several people who replied. I had, in fact, all the information, but a sudden mental lapse made me completely misplace it! I can, in fact, trace this very coin back to 1938!
How were you able to trace that far back? I would really like to trace some of my coins back to other sales and get a better provinance, but do not have access to many sales catalogs, especially old ones.

Thanks,

Paul
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Old Mar 23, 2011, 11:55 AM   #6
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Paul -
I have written an article for the Celator about finding provenance for coins in my collection. Here is a quick summary:

It only takes the separation of an individual coin from information about its acquisition for provenance to get “lost.” How does this happen? Dealers or collectors who purchase coins without documentation of its provenance may not be able to find that coin listed in a specific auction or reference.
With no provenance at the time of acquisition, finding information require time, patience and some luck.
Once a coin is separated from its provenance, how can the provenance be re-established with certainty? The first criterion is that the coin has to be an exact die match. It should also match in terms of weight, diameter and die axis. The most important step is a careful comparison of flan characteristics, die alignment on the flan and distinguishing flaws and marks. Fortunately, most ancient coins are different enough from others of the same die type that a match can be made by comparing the coin with an illustration

Here are some guidelines for getting started:

Look through old catalogs, articles & references (requires lots of time, patience & luck)

Online search engines: Wildwinds, CoinArchives, ACsearch

Online catalogs & references:
http://catalog.hathitrust.org/ (Naville I -Pozzi 1920, IV 1924, Sotheby -Bunbury 1896)
http://guberman.blogspot.com/ (Hirsch XII -Rhousopoulos 1905, XXI -Weber 1907)
http://www.dirtyoldbooks.com/catalogs/ ( Naville IX 1925, NAC 4, 6, 9, 11, 13, 15)http://books.google.com

I have been successful at finding significant provenance (major collections like Evans, Weber, Jameson and even hoards) for some of my coins. Let me know how you fare.

John Tatman
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Old Mar 23, 2011, 09:22 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacktat View Post
Paul -
I have written an article for the Celator about finding provenance for coins in my collection. Here is a quick summary:

It only takes the separation of an individual coin from information about its acquisition for provenance to get “lost.” How does this happen? Dealers or collectors who purchase coins without documentation of its provenance may not be able to find that coin listed in a specific auction or reference.
With no provenance at the time of acquisition, finding information require time, patience and some luck.
Once a coin is separated from its provenance, how can the provenance be re-established with certainty? The first criterion is that the coin has to be an exact die match. It should also match in terms of weight, diameter and die axis. The most important step is a careful comparison of flan characteristics, die alignment on the flan and distinguishing flaws and marks. Fortunately, most ancient coins are different enough from others of the same die type that a match can be made by comparing the coin with an illustration

Here are some guidelines for getting started:

Look through old catalogs, articles & references (requires lots of time, patience & luck)

Online search engines: Wildwinds, CoinArchives, ACsearch

Online catalogs & references:
http://catalog.hathitrust.org/ (Naville I -Pozzi 1920, IV 1924, Sotheby -Bunbury 1896)
http://guberman.blogspot.com/ (Hirsch XII -Rhousopoulos 1905, XXI -Weber 1907)
http://www.dirtyoldbooks.com/catalogs/ ( Naville IX 1925, NAC 4, 6, 9, 11, 13, 15)http://books.google.com

I have been successful at finding significant provenance (major collections like Evans, Weber, Jameson and even hoards) for some of my coins. Let me know how you fare.

John Tatman
Thank you very much. I am going to look and see if I can find some of my coins. I could get hooked on this.

Paul
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Old Mar 25, 2011, 05:16 PM   #8
djmacdo
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Finding provenance

The computerized collections of images, such as Coin Archives, are invaluable for tracing coins. If a type is sufficiently rare, references in books can lead you to early sales. Parallels to examples in modern sales can also lead to earlier sales and the photos there. It is a slow process but fun. On the other hand, I am going crazy right now searching for two references in Romanian archaeological publications so rare that there are no holdings in any library in the United States, and my inter-library loan department can only scratch its collective heads.

Mac
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