Ancients.info - The Online Resource for Ancient Coins & Antiquities  

Go Back   Ancients.info - The Online Resource for Ancient Coins & Antiquities > Miscellaneous > Antiquities
Home Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Sidebar Off

Antiquities All ancient non-coin objects.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old Jan 29, 2011, 11:22 AM   #1
cogito
Moderator
 
cogito's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Piedmont of North Carolina
Posts: 1,721
   View My Photo Gallery
Salient Counterpoint Example to Strict Cultural Repatriation

CAIRO | Fri Jan 28, 2011 3:25pm EST

(Reuters) - Army units secured the Egyptian Museum in central Cairo against possible looting on Friday, protecting a building with spectacular pharaonic treasures such as the death mask of the boy king Tutankhamun, state TV said.

The news follows a day of violent anti-government protests in Cairo and other cities. Some of the most violent scenes in four days of protests have been in squares and streets close to the museum building.

It was also broadcast as reports of looting of some government buildings emerged. One Reuters photographer said looters had broken into a ruling party building near the museum and were walking out with furniture, computers and other items.

Well-known Egyptian film director Khaled Youssef had earlier called on the army to ensure the museum was protected, in comments to the Al Arabiya television channel.

"I am calling on the Egyptian army to head instantly to the Egyptian museum. There is a fire right next to it in the (ruling) Party headquarters," said Youssef, who has directed movies critical of government policies.

State TV carried a brief headline saying the army had secured the museum but did not give any more details.

The museum contains a huge quantity of ancient antiquities, including the contents of the tomb of Tutankhamun that was discovered by Howard Carter in 1922. The gold death mask is one of the most spectacular pieces.

http://life.time.mk/read/2c56eb24bc/...89a/index.html

============================

What happens to a country's archeological heritage when it is under threat from political instability and unrest? If all Egyptian antiquities were returned home, as the archeological police would like, and the Cairo Museum was then destroyed...how would this be different than the loss to the world community of the Library at Alexandria? Maybe it is safer to distribute cultural materials as a "hedge" against the very sort of political instability and unrest that we are currently seeing in Egypt and we have seen to great detriment in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Jeff
cogito is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 29, 2011, 11:42 AM   #2
cogito
Moderator
 
cogito's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Piedmont of North Carolina
Posts: 1,721
   View My Photo Gallery
http://blogs.aljazeera.net/middle-ea...egypt-protests

The 6:45pm update notes that antiquities have been damaged in the Cairo Museum.

Puts Hawass' recent and annoying complaints about NYC not taking care of the gifted Isis Obelisk in perspective, doesn't it. He must be on the verge of a heart attack given the damage that is being done at the hands of his own countrymen. I'm just glad that Berlin told him to take a flying leap regarding repatriation of the Nefertiti Bust.

J

Last edited by cogito : Jan 30, 2011 at 11:27 AM.
cogito is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 29, 2011, 12:50 PM   #3
4to2centophilia
Registered User
 
4to2centophilia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1,498
   View My Photo Gallery
The irony would be side splittingly funny if not for the fact that the civil unrest has the potential to spread..................to what end.......who knows, but it looks very shakey over there.
__________________
.
.
"When you are in Rome live in the Roman style; when you are elsewhere live as they live elsewhere" St. Ambrose (340-397) to St. Augustine.
4to2centophilia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 29, 2011, 06:37 PM   #4
cogito
Moderator
 
cogito's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Piedmont of North Carolina
Posts: 1,721
   View My Photo Gallery
Prepare to be sickened. Tut treasures damaged.

http://hyperallergic.com/17815/egyptian-museum-damage/
cogito is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 30, 2011, 01:29 PM   #5
RobertB
 
Posts: n/a
View My Photo Gallery
to get to the *really* sickening part, you have scroll all the way to the bottom where it is discussed that the Natl Museum looters were probably museum employees / guards.

http://hyperallergic.com/17896/egypt...emphis-looted/

--Robert
  Reply With Quote
Old Jan 30, 2011, 04:45 PM   #6
4to2centophilia
Registered User
 
4to2centophilia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1,498
   View My Photo Gallery
It was just on NBC Nightly News, it was lengthy and sad.
__________________
.
.
"When you are in Rome live in the Roman style; when you are elsewhere live as they live elsewhere" St. Ambrose (340-397) to St. Augustine.
4to2centophilia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 31, 2011, 10:47 AM   #7
tcore
Registered User
 
tcore's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 81
   View My Photo Gallery
Absolutely terrible... and sad. I never have understood how someone could recklessly damage someone else's property, much less treasures such as these.
tcore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 1, 2011, 10:32 AM   #8
nomisma
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: New England
Posts: 15
   View My Photo Gallery
Check out this editorial in today's Wall Street Journal:

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...ts+antiquities

Don
__________________
Don Squires
nomisma@comcast.net
nomisma is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 1, 2011, 11:46 AM   #9
Nikolaos
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 26
View My Photo Gallery
Quote:
Originally Posted by nomisma View Post
Check out this editorial in today's Wall Street Journal:

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...ts+antiquities

Don
The comparison to Greece is absolutely absurd. The political system or events cannot compare to Egypt. Just because students in London burnt down buildings and cars in the recent tuition fee rises does not mean that they should not study there. I am more of a supporter of the idea that history belongs to the world rather than nations but this article is just pulling the ropes a bit too far when it comes to the debate related to the marbles.
Nikolaos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 1, 2011, 01:06 PM   #10
hummell
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 39
View My Photo Gallery
Although I don't support the return of the parthenon marbles to athens, simply because more people can see then in london, the comparisson between greece and egypt is stupid. I've lived in both places and I can tell you that no matter how lowlife a greek person is, he would never vandalize cultural heritage. While in middle east or north africa they don't consider these artifacts as part of their past because most of them are semifanatic muslims and don't care about these things.
hummell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 2, 2011, 07:43 AM   #11
djmacdo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 171
View My Photo Gallery
Greek damage to Greek Antiquities

I think we ought to be careful in asserting that any group is somehow morally above damaging its own cultural heritage. I seem to remember artillery shells landing on the acropolis in Athens during the coup attempt in the late 1940s, and there are also almost annually illegal forest fires set to nullify attempts to preserve the natural landscape of Greece. I do not want to give the impression that Americans are any better. The plans to build a casino on the battlefield of Gettysburg is moving ahead, and there are frequent horror tales of Indian archaeological sites treated with total disregard.
djmacdo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 2, 2011, 08:34 AM   #12
4to2centophilia
Registered User
 
4to2centophilia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1,498
   View My Photo Gallery
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/02/wo...uities.html?hp

Apparently (wink, wink) everything is back to normal.

AND Jeffs close friend and idol (joking Jeff) has gotten a promotion to a cabinet position.

Problems? What problems?
__________________
.
.
"When you are in Rome live in the Roman style; when you are elsewhere live as they live elsewhere" St. Ambrose (340-397) to St. Augustine.
4to2centophilia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 2, 2011, 09:02 AM   #13
Roma_Orbis
Registered User
 
Roma_Orbis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Paris
Posts: 841
   View My Photo Gallery
For secondary sites, the situation is quite worrying, see this detailed article, for those reading French:
http://www.lepoint.fr/actu-science/l...-134568_59.php

(Edit) Google-translated here:
http://translate.google.com/translat...-134568_59.php

Jérôme

Last edited by Roma_Orbis : Feb 3, 2011 at 04:06 PM.
Roma_Orbis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 13, 2011, 02:33 PM   #14
cogito
Moderator
 
cogito's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Piedmont of North Carolina
Posts: 1,721
   View My Photo Gallery
So much for the hunky-dory talk from Hawass about how nothing bad came of the Egyptian Museum break-in:

http://edition.cnn.com/2011/WORLD/me...l?eref=edition

Too bad those articles weren't on tour or housed at the Met at the time.

J
cogito is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:50 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content copyright © 2002-2006, VHobbies.com, LLC. All rights reserved.