Ancients.info - The Online Resource for Ancient Coins & Antiquities  

Go Back   Ancients.info - The Online Resource for Ancient Coins & Antiquities > Miscellaneous > Education
Home Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Sidebar Off

Education Fostering interest in ancient history and coins.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old Jun 24, 2007, 06:02 PM   #1
Wisecentaur
Registered User
 
Wisecentaur's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Southern Ohio
Posts: 75
   View My Photo Gallery
Clashed Dies

Hello,

I have been musing about the lack of clashed dies on ancient coins. Many American coins exhibit tell tale signs of clashed dies namely the imprint of one die onto the opposite when they contact without a planchet or flan between. It seems almost impossible for the ancients to have always had a blank between the dies when the strike occurred. Since there are example of brockages it leads me to believe that the minting process was a very rapid process and prone to mistakes like clashed dies.

Does anyone have examples of die clashes or an explanation as to why they are not common?

Thanks,

Dave
__________________
Greetings,

Wisecentaur
Wisecentaur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 24, 2007, 07:10 PM   #2
curtislclay
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 316
   View My Photo Gallery
Die clashes are in fact very common on Roman coins, as evidenced by the incuse portrait outlines, sometimes with incuse obv. legend also, often found in the rev. fields.

Something of a mystery is why the rev. designs were not usually transferred to the obv. dies by the same mishaps. The obv. die was mainly a big hollow for the portrait, so there was less level die surface to receive impressions from the clashed rev. die.

Doug Smith has a useful essay on this phenomenon, with images of examples.
curtislclay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 24, 2007, 07:56 PM   #3
Congius
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 211
View My Photo Gallery
Obviously (apparently) bronze coins were struck at quite a pace that didn't give time to correct for mishaps. The striker was wound up and coming down to strike the next coin regardless of whether the previous one had been successfully removed and a new flan positioned or not. Die clashes themselves arn't so rare, but they anyways only represent an extreme case. The more common errror case is that the team *almost* made it and you get a double strike or off-flan strike, and these are, as expected, much more common.

Here's a nice example from my collection of a die clash.

Ben
Attached Images
File Type: jpg ConstantineSolDieClash.jpg (43.9 KB, 56 views)

Last edited by Congius : Jun 25, 2007 at 01:02 AM.
Congius is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 24, 2007, 08:16 PM   #4
Wisecentaur
Registered User
 
Wisecentaur's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Southern Ohio
Posts: 75
   View My Photo Gallery
Curtis and Ben,

Your comments and the example are appreciated. I guess that a clash may not be as obvious on ancients as american coins. Someting I need to work on.

My main collecting interest is Greek. Are there any examples of early clashes on Greek coins? Interestingly, I searched for "clash" on V-coins and several examples turned up on Roman coins but none on Greek.

Thanks for the response.

Dave
__________________
Greetings,

Wisecentaur
Wisecentaur is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:38 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content copyright © 2002-2006, VHobbies.com, LLC. All rights reserved.